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OTS 116: Challenging Typical Handwriting Traditions

OTS 116: Challenging Typical Handwriting Traditions

Click on your preferred podcast player link to listen wherever you enjoy podcasts Welcome to the show notes for Episode 116 of the OT Schoolhouse Podcast. Have you ever thought of having your students be the handwriting teachers? By having students apply what they learned during an OT session, they can go back into the classroom to share the letter stories and formations with everyone… including the teacher! This is a great functional way to help them solidify what they learned. Today, Cheryl Bregman is here to discuss some common handwriting norms on which she is flipping the script. We also dive into how children have been affected with dysgraphia and pseudo dysgraphia and how a collaborative approach can help. Tune in to learn about an awesome handwriting program Cheryl has created that can help a child learn to write in five weeks! Tune in to learn the following objectives: Learners will identify why it is beneficial to start with learning lowercase letters Learners will identify the reasons children may present with pseudo dysgraphia Learners will identify and understand how reading and writing collide and impact one another Learners will identify how handwriting heroes use a multi-sensory approach and how it is beneficial for all children, especially those with learning disabilities. Learners will identify specific assessments that do not correlate with handwriting outcomes. Guest Bio Cheryl Bregman, MS, OTR/L Cheryl Bregman, MS, OTR/L earned her Bachelor of Science degree in Occupational Therapy from the University of Cape Town, South Africa, and a Master of Science degree in Technology in Special Education from Johns Hopkins University. Her specific research interests involve handwriting development and the integration of assistive technology in school settings. With over 25 years of experience, Cheryl has extensive experience working with children who have developmental coordination disorders (DCD), learning disabilities, and attention issues. Quotes “We really do need to think about starting with lowercase, particularly for students with learning disabilities… They had a really hard time with differentiating between upper and lowercase” - Cheryl Bregman, MS, OTR/L “If we can make handwriting easier, more automatic to our students, then they can use that brainpower for higher level skills” - Cheryl Bregman, MS, OTR/L “Look more carefully at the students and what their needs are, not to just confine it to whether or not something is legible. Look beyond that, so you can help that child functionally” - Cheryl Bregman, MS, OTR/L “It's not that they necessarily have dysgraphia… they're in front of a computer for two-three years, and all they did was try and type, so they haven't had the experience” - Jayson Davies, M.A., OTR/L “Practice makes permanent, not perfect” -Jayson Davies, M.A., OTR/L Resources: Decosta Writing Protocol Handwriting Heroes Handwriting Heroes Blog Thanks for listening to the OT Schoolhouse Podcast! Be sure to subscribe to the OT Schoolhouse email list & get access to our free downloads of Gray-Space paper and the Occupational Profile for school-based OTs. Subscribe now! Thanks for visiting the podcast show notes! If you enjoyed this episode, be sure to subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcast, Spotify, or wherever you listen to podcasts Click here to view more episodes of the OT Schoolhouse Podcast

OTS 115: Going Beyond Trauma-Informed Care

OTS 115: Going Beyond Trauma-Informed Care

Click on your preferred podcast player link to listen wherever you enjoy podcasts. Welcome to the show notes for Episode 115 of the OT Schoolhouse Podcast. What do you think of when you hear the phrase trauma responsive? This concept goes beyond trauma-informed care. Tune in to hear Dr. Gibbs speak about her book, Trauma Treatment in Action, and how as OTPs, we need to be more responsive to the needs of a client regarding their mental health, just as if we were working with someone who had a stroke or other physical ailment. Tune in to learn the following objectives: Learners will identify the five dimensions of trauma and how to use these in practice. Learners will identify what ACTION is and how it can be used in OT. Learners will identify how an OTP can address mental health with a student. Guest Bio Varleisha D. Gibbs, Ph.D., OTD, OTR/L Varleisha D. Gibbs, Ph.D., OTD, OTR/L, is the Vice President of Practice Engagement and Capacity Building at the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA). She previously served as the Scientific Programs Officer at the American Occupational Therapy Foundation. Dr. Gibbs is an occupational therapist, international lecturer, researcher, and author. Her areas of expertise include neuroanatomy, self-regulation strategies across the lifespan, health inequities, and trauma-responsive approaches. Dr. Gibbs founded and operated a private therapy firm for over 10 years. Dr. Gibbs began her career after receiving her baccalaureate degree in Psychology from the University of Delaware. She continued her studies in the field of Occupational Therapy, receiving a Masters of Science degree from Columbia University and a clinical doctorate from Thomas Jefferson University. Dr. Gibbs completed her Ph.D. program in Health Sciences Leadership at Seton Hall University. Memorable Quotes from this Episode “Mental health is something that we all have. That’s not a disorder… Everyone requires support. There are social drivers that could lead us to healthy outcomes or adverse outcomes” - Varleisha Gibbs, Ph.D., OTD, OTR/L “That's what we do… occupation is about the doing and the being. And we need to make sure that we're not just informed, but that we are addressing trauma in a responsive manner” - Varleisha Gibbs, Ph.D., OTD, OTR/L “I really don't know any other profession that does this. We look at the person. But we also look at the context and environment” - Varleisha Gibbs, Ph.D., OTD, OTR/L “Growth could happen at any moment. Despite the child that may have a severe diagnoses, they can still show some growth on that hierarchy” - Varleisha Gibbs, Ph.D., OTD, OTR/L "We need to keep in mind that we're supporting their students and we're doing the best job that we can do. But we also have to be mindful about their own mental health and how they are perceiving the IEP process in itself” - Jayson Davies, M.A, OTR/L “If we don't start to use that language that relates to mental and behavioral health, then we will continue to not have that seat at the table” - Varleisha Gibbs, PhD, OTD, OTR/L Resources: Dr. Gibbs Books - Amazon Seminars - Dr. Gibbs Sensory processing course - Dr. Gibbs Book on intergenerational Trauma - Dr. Degruy Epigenetics Research Article - Natan Pf Kellermann Video on Brain Changes Mental Health in Non-Psychiatric Settings - AOTA Mental Health and Wellbeing - AOTA CommunOT 988 and OT - AOTA 988 Suicide & Crisis Lifeline Dr. Gibbs Website Dr. Gibbs Instagram Dr. Gibbs Twitter Dr. Gibbs Linkedin Dr. Gibbs Email Thanks for listening to the OT Schoolhouse Podcast! Be sure to subscribe to the OT Schoolhouse email list & get access to our free downloads of Gray-Space paper and the Occupational Profile for school-based OTs. Subscribe now! Thanks for visiting the podcast show notes! If you enjoyed this episode, be sure to subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcast, Spotify, or wherever you listen to podcasts. Click here to view more episodes of the OT Schoolhouse Podcast

OTS 114: Dysgraphia: How You Can Support Teachers & Students

OTS 114: Dysgraphia: How You Can Support Teachers & Students

Click on your preferred podcast player link to listen wherever you enjoy podcasts Welcome to the show notes for Episode 114 of the OT Schoolhouse Podcast. Did you know that Einstein and Thomas Edison may have had dysgraphia? In our chat with Cheri Dotterer today, she discusses the truth about dysgraphia. A lot of us have had specific beliefs about what dysgraphia consists of, but the true definition may surprise you. She also explores the different types of dysgraphia and bilateral integration, which include interlaced, symmetrical, and asymmetrical. Tune in to learn even more about dysgraphia, and the results of a 6-week handwriting club focused on visual perception, visual motor, and memory with limited pencil use. Tune in to learn the following objectives: Learners will identify the different tiers and types of dysgraphia Learners will identify the different types of bilateral integration Learners will identify two-minute interventions that address the core components of writing Guest Bio Cheri Dotterer, OTR/L Cheri is an international speaker, author, and consultant who trains adults to shift their mindsets about struggling writers to strengthen the social-emotional well-being of people with dysgraphia so they can fully engage in life activities and unleash their potential to change their future and other generations through the written word. She has been an occupational therapist for 25 years. Her book, Handwriting Brain-Body DisConnect, has remained in the Top 100 on Amazon since publication in Handwriting Reference and Learning Disabilities. It was also a Top 10 Finalist in the Author Academy Awards in 2019. In addition, she was nominated for the USA 2022 Dysgraphia Expert of the Year by Global Health and Pharma Magazine. Quotes “Kids don't understand those symbols. And that's part of what we can do and help, as occupational therapists, is we can help them with understanding the overall concept, and how it applies to life” Cheri Dotterer, MS, OTR/L “Dysgraphia is a disability or delay in grammar, punctuation, capitalization, sentence structure, paragraph organization and clarity, and spelling” Cheri Dotterer, MS, OTR/L “Did they effectively get enough background in their education to understand the language…reading is truly a sensory process with a little bit of ocular motor going on” Cheri Dotterer, MS, OTR/L “We can help instruct the teacher or the aides on how to provide the student with the just right challenge and let them problem solve during their assignments, as opposed to giving them the answer or writing it down so that they're copying” Jayson Davies, MA, OTR/L “Visual perception, visual motor, and memory, because those are the big three core components of writing that are the foundation; if we don't have those foundations, language and cognition aren't really going to effectively integrate” Cheri Dotterer, MS, OTR/L Resources: THS-R Cheri Website Writing Glitch Community Handwriting Brain-Body Disconnect Math Dys-Connected - available soon Thanks for listening to the OT Schoolhouse Podcast! Be sure to subscribe to the OT Schoolhouse email list & get access to our free downloads of Gray-Space paper and the Occupational Profile for school-based OTs. Subscribe now! Thanks for visiting the podcast show notes! If you enjoyed this episode, be sure to subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcast, Spotify, or wherever you listen to podcasts Click here to view more episodes of the OT Schoolhouse Podcast

OTS 113: Finding Motivation in Transition-Aged Students: From Limitations to Success

OTS 113: Finding Motivation in Transition-Aged Students: From Limitations to Success

Click on your preferred podcast player link to listen wherever you enjoy podcasts Welcome to the show notes for Episode 113 of the OT Schoolhouse Podcast. Have you ever thought about what it might look like working with transition-aged students? Even if you are currently working with them now, you may still question how to best use your skills to work with these older school-aged students effectively. Today, we are speaking with Justin Lundstedt, OTR/L, where he will discuss many areas of TAS and executive functioning. Tune in to learn how you can help these students find motivation and success in their life outside of school. Tune in to learn the following objectives: Learners will identify what transition-aged students are Learners will identify how OTPs can work with transition-aged students Learners will identify how the domains of the OTPF-4 play a role in transition-aged students Guest Bio Justin Lundstedt, OTR/L Justin Lundstedt is an occupational therapist of over 20 years. Over these two decades, Justin has worked primarily in pediatrics. He has spent time in physical rehabilitation, private clinic work, the special education field, and private therapy services. The majority of his professional career has been spent working in the special education field, where he has developed a strong interest in the development of executive function skills and how they are a key to so many of our student's ongoing struggles with regard to personal goal achievement. He specializes in the transition-age student because he believes this is an underutilized area for OT, and it has direct involvement with the success of our students transitioning from school to the community. Justin has developed his own practice and Brand to focus on these specific areas. He currently owns Achieve Life OT & PT PLLC and has created a separate entity to focus on the education and development of other OTs in the executive Function World named: The Executive Function OT. He has created an evergreen course called OT and Executive Function of the Transition Age student, has recently participated in Jayson Davies Back to School OT conference, and has hosted multiple other webinars on this topic as well. He hopes to develop a niche that will help our profession as OTs develop in a way where we are seen for our knowledge and potential in the world of executive function. Quotes “We're so focused on getting our students to, you know, a certain academic level or demonstrating this certain skill, that we focus again on those proximal goals so much, and we forget about the distal” - Justin Lundstedt, OTR/L “I do believe that we all have the capability, and motivation drives us, so if there's really that will to do, there's a way to find it” - Justin Lundstedt, OTR/L “You are not a one-to-one aid when you push into a classroom, you're not a teacher, you are an OT, and you have the skill set of an OT working with those students” - Jayson Davies, MA, OTR/L “What I'm really seeing at the older ages is, our expectations are high, where they may not have that development, and the development has changed” - Justin Lundstedt, OTR/L Resources: COPM Justin’s Executive Functioning Course Occupational Therapists for Executive Function Facebook Group Justin’s Instagram Executive Function OT Website Executive Function Book Thanks for listening to the OT Schoolhouse Podcast! Be sure to subscribe to the OT Schoolhouse email list & get access to our free downloads of Gray-Space paper and the Occupational Profile for school-based OTs. Subscribe now! Thanks for visiting the podcast show notes! If you enjoyed this episode, be sure to subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcast, Spotify, or wherever you listen to podcasts Click here to view more episodes of the OT Schoolhouse Podcast

OTS 112: Why the CDC Updated the Developmental Milestones Checklist

OTS 112: Why the CDC Updated the Developmental Milestones Checklist

Click on your preferred podcast player link to listen wherever you enjoy podcasts Welcome to the show notes for Episode 112 of the OT Schoolhouse Podcast. Were you flabbergasted when the CDC changed the guidelines for developmental milestones In February? You weren’t alone. But it is important to look deeper at why these changes were made. The CDC was tasked with updating the milestones and making them less confusing for those who rely on them most - parents. The milestones are still (mostly) the same, and they are backed by research, as we discuss with Dr. Kate Barlow in the episode. Kate is an ambassador for the CDC, and she talks to us about the milestones that are established for the first 5 years of a child's life. Kate describes why this is important for us OTPs that are in schools. Tune in to find out why! Tune in to learn the following objectives: Learners will identify what the developmental monitor program is used for Learners will identify why the 75th percentile is no longer included on the CDC milestones checklist Learners will identify how the CDC milestones app can be used by OTPs Guest Bio Kate Barlow, OTD, MS, OTR/L Dr. Barlow is an Associate Professor at American International College. She is also the CDC’s Learn the Signs. Act Early. Ambassador for the state of Massachusetts. Dr. Barlow received her BS in Occupational Therapy from Boston University and her MS and OTD from Virginia Commonwealth University. She has over 20 years of clinical experience in pediatrics, and her areas of expertise are in pediatric feeding and early identification of delays. As the CDC’s Act Early Ambassador for Massachusetts, Dr. Barlow has been working in Public Health to promote developmental monitoring and screening within Head Start and WIC centers across the state. Dr. Barlow won the 2022 NBCOT Innovation award for her work in global outreach. She founded the International Interprofessional Mentorship Program in June of 2019, which currently provides mentorship to therapists in low- and middle-income countries. Quotes “Prior to COVID, when the research was done, the CDC was estimating that more than 50% of the children that need services before age three are not receiving them” - Kate Barlow, OTD, MS, OTR/L “Developmental monitoring is done by everybody in the community…Parents, teachers, clinicians, YMCA workers, at-home day workers, Headstart teachers… This is a public health tool” -Kate Barlow, OTD, MS, OTR/L “Now it's much clearer, you check one of these boxes, go see the doctor. So I really like that it's much more direct” -Kate Barlow, OTD, MS, OTR/L “I'm glad now that we're hearing the reason it came off is because there wasn't the research to support that 75th percentile for crawling… as a profession, we try to be research-based and now we know why that happened” -Jayson Davies, MA, OTR/L “You know, and a lot of times people don't have the same pediatrician, so they're seeing someone different every single time. So it's a great tool to help families communicate with their doctors” -Kate Barlow, OTD, MS, OTR/L Resources: Dr. Barlow’s Linkedin International Interprofessional Mentorship Program Learn the Signs. Act Early CDC Massachusetts Act Early Campaign Apple Podcast CDC milestones- AOTA WFOT article Feeding Matters Conference Project ECHO SOS Approach to Feeding Association for Education of Young Children Infant Mental Health Endorsement CDC Milestone Update Video Watch Me Training -CDC Thanks for listening to the OT Schoolhouse Podcast! Be sure to subscribe to the OT Schoolhouse email list & get access to our free downloads of Gray-Space paper and the Occupational Profile for school-based OTs. Subscribe now! Thanks for visiting the podcast show notes! If you enjoyed this episode, be sure to subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcast, Spotify, or wherever you listen to podcasts Click here to view more episodes of the OT Schoolhouse Podcast

OTS 111: Back To Our Roots: Mental Health and The School-Based Role

OTS 111: Back To Our Roots: Mental Health and The School-Based Role

Click on your preferred podcast player link to listen wherever you enjoy podcasts Welcome to the show notes for Episode 111 of the OT Schoolhouse Podcast. As OTPs, we were taught that our profession was founded on providing a safe space for those with mental illnesses, and we were there to help them engage in meaningful occupations, yet we tend to forget the importance of this. Today, we speak with Moni Keen to address her capstone research on being an interprofessional team member and mental health in school-aged children. OTPs are often not seen as mental health providers, but we must advocate and change that narrative. Tune in to learn how we can advocate for mental health and how we can address mental health individually with our students and on a systems level. Tune in to learn the following objectives: Learners will identify reasons why mental health is not being addressed in schools Learners will identify why OTPs are not labeled as mental health providers Learners will identify mental health diagnoses of school-aged children and youth Learners will identify and reflect on the causes of mental health issues among our students Learners will identify how to advocate for mental health in OT Learners will identify how to advocate for students on a systems level Guest Bio Monica Keen, OTD, OTR/L Dr. Monica Keen is currently an Associate Professor at Presbyterian College. She is the Doctoral Capstone Coordinator and comes to Presbyterian College with 33 years of clinical experience. Dr. Keen retired in May of this year after 27 years of school-based practice. She is an adjunct instructor at Baylor University and she is a contributing faculty member at the University of St. Augustine. She was an adjunct instructor for 7 years with the Medical University of South Carolina. Her 33 years of clinical practice included working in mental health at the Institute of Psychiatry at the Medical University of South Carolina, acute care, and nursing home settings. She owned a private pediatric practice for 12 years and closed the doors of Developing Abilities when she took on full-time academia. She has authored two separate chapters for colleagues’ books: one on school-based and infant mental health and the other on handwriting. Dr. Keen has done two webinars for OccupationalTherapy.com where she presented her Capstone work on OT being a part of an interprofessional team member for mental health in school-aged children. Her second webinar was on how COVID-19 impacted the behavior of school-aged children. In September of 2022, Dr. Keen was a guest on Jayson Davies’ OT Schoolhouse podcast where the topic of discussion was occupational therapy and school-based mental health. Currently, she is the co-chair for Mental Health for her state’s professional organization, the South Carolina Occupational Therapy Association. Dr. Keen graduated with her bachelor’s degree in Occupational Therapy from the Medical University of South Carolina, and in 2008 she earned her master’s degree from Boston University. In 2019 she graduated with high honors with her clinical doctorate degree from the University of St. Augustine. She is passionate about Occupational Therapy and has a distinct interest in mental health, trauma-informed care, and pediatrics, particularly autism. Mental health is a passion for Dr. Keen. Her capstone was on serving as a member of an interprofessional school team to address mental health issues in school-based practice. Her research findings were sobering and have ignited a desire to discover ways to re-establish OT as a recognized mental health provider. Monica resides in Greenville, SC, and is a proud mom to two amazing adult daughters. She has two adorable Boston Terriers (Bubbles and Boomer), she loves college football, enjoys running and hiking, and being in the sun by the pool or beach is a favorite pastime. Quotes “We have got a significant amount of work that we have to do to regain the momentum of getting back into being recognized as a qualified mental health provider” - Monica Keen OTD, OTR/L “It is paramount that whenever we document on a therapy session, that we do include something about the mental health aspect of that 30 minutes” - Monica Keen, OTD, OTR/L “We know mental health is important, but we don't constantly look at it unless we put it at the forefront of our brain” - Jayson Davies, M.A., OTR/L “Sometimes that IEP objective has to take the backseat for a session because that's not what the child needs at that point in time. Sometimes we’ve just got to meet them where they're at, and get them through that moment and then pick up the ball the next week” - Monica Keen, OTD, OTR/L “It is being their voice for those who cannot advocate for themselves. We are their voice and we need to take that seriously” - Monica Keen, OTD, OTR/L Resources: Powerfully You- Self Regulation Education How Does Your Engine Run?® The Out-of-Sync Child - Carol Stock Kranowitz Beyond Behaviors - Dr. Mona Delahooke Monica Keen - Linkedin keene@presby.edu -Email Mollisoo@aol.com -Email Intentional Relationship Model Occupational Therapy Mental Health Parity Act Kawa Model School-Based Occupational Therapy and Student Mental Health Course Thanks for listening to the OT Schoolhouse Podcast! Be sure to subscribe to the OT Schoolhouse email list & get access to our free downloads of Gray-Space paper and the Occupational Profile for school-based OTs. Subscribe now! Thanks for visiting the podcast show notes! If you enjoyed this episode, be sure to subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcast, Spotify, or wherever you listen to podcasts Click here to view more episodes of the OT Schoolhouse Podcast

OTS 110: Common Core left Handwriting Behind!

OTS 110: Common Core left Handwriting Behind!

Click on your preferred podcast player link to listen wherever you enjoy podcasts Welcome to the show notes for Episode 110 of the OT Schoolhouse Podcast. School-based OT practitioners are not handwriting teachers! However, handwriting is often the most common reason for referral. In our chat with Debra Collette today, we are discussing a recent article where she surveyed teachers, administrators, and therapists on the missing pieces of handwriting in schools. Ten years ago, common core began to take over school standards, but the standards neglected to include handwriting. Tune in to learn how common core standards have impacted handwriting and how you can support students and teachers in implementing a handwriting curriculum. Tune in to learn the following objectives: Learners will identify the connects and disconnects between the common core curriculum with handwriting Learners will identify the impact common core has made on children’s written expression Learners will identify how common core and handwriting can impact OTPs Learners will identify what OTPs can do to support curriculum and handwriting on a systems level Earn Continuing Education for Listening to this Episode Wish you could earn professional development for listening to the OT Schoolhouse Podcast? Now you can! Click here to purchase the professional development opportunity that corresponds to this episode. Here's how it works in three simple steps: Listen to the episode on this page or wherever you listen to podcasts. Purchase the professional development opportunity. Take the short quiz and earn your certificate. It's the professional development you want on your own schedule. Click here to earn your certificate of completion for episode 109 now. Guest Bio Debra L. Collette, OTD, OTR/L Debra Collette is an Associate Professor and Program Director at Russell Sage College in Troy, NY. She was a school-based OT for 18 years with experience in K-12 and Assistive Technology. Debra has presented findings through AOTA and NYSOTA and has published them in AJOT and OTJR. In addition, she is an instructor for the AOTA Fieldwork Educator Certification Program (FWECP). Quotes “Teachers don’t get handwriting instruction in their college or academic programs” Debra Collette, OTD, OTR/L “We have this set of common core standards that tells us what we should be doing in education. But because there is nothing specific to handwriting, it's easy to set it aside and not think about it again” Debra Collette, OTD, OTR/L “40 minutes in a week is really not enough… we practice for musical instruments, or we practice for a sport, we have to put a lot more time in than just 40 minutes a week. So that foundational component of handwriting would be much more beneficial if it was a greater number of minutes per week” Debra Collette, OTD, OTR/L “As we type more and more and as high stakes testing is turning towards a typed response versus a written response… there's also research out there to support the fact that motor skills of learning handwriting, support that overall type response to if you know it, you're going to be quicker at the type response” Debra Collette, OTD, OTR/L “The teachers benefit from seeing it, and the child benefits from being able to be successful in that classroom in front of the teacher,” Debra Collette, OTD, OTR/L “...pick a few that you're strong at and that you feel good about, representing where a child's strengths and challenges are within. If you don't understand the language behind an assessment, is that worth giving?” Debra Collette, OTD, OTR/L Resources: Handwriting and Common Core State Standards Article - Debra Collette A Historical Journey Through the Development of Handwriting Instruction Article -Denise Donica Handwriting Instruction in Elementary Schools -Asha V. Asher OTJR Proloquo 2go Article -Debra Collette RTI Handwriting assessments: THS-R Minnesota Manual Dexterity ETCH Evaluation Tool of Children's Handwriting Peabody Developmental Motor Scales BOT-2 Sensory Profile Sensory Processing Measure Thanks for listening to the OT Schoolhouse Podcast! Be sure to subscribe to the OT Schoolhouse email list & get access to our free downloads of Gray-Space paper and the Occupational Profile for school-based OTs. Subscribe now! Thanks for visiting the podcast show notes! If you enjoyed this episode, be sure to subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcast, Spotify, or wherever you listen to podcasts Click here to view more episodes of the OT Schoolhouse Podcast

Episode 109: From One Coffee Cart to an entire Community-Based Instruction Program

Episode 109: From One Coffee Cart to an entire Community-Based Instruction Program

Click on your preferred podcast player link to listen wherever you enjoy podcasts Welcome to the show notes for Episode 109 of the OT Schoolhouse Podcast. Did you know that transitional services can be implemented even before a student gets to high school? In this episode, we talk about how community-based instruction (CBI) can be implemented in the elementary school setting and how these children benefit greatly from starting early. Debbie Schwind discusses how she developed a campus-based CBI program for the students with just a coffee cart and how the program grew with the help of supportive teachers, staff, and administrators. Tune in to learn the following objectives: Learners will identify what community-based instruction looks like in an elementary school setting Learners will identify a model that can help with CBI program development Learners will identify the benefits of a CBI program Earn Continuing Education for Listening to this Episode Wish you could earn professional development for listening to the OT Schoolhouse Podcast? Now you can! Click here to purchase the professional development opportunity that corresponds to this episode. Here's how it works in three simple steps: Listen to the episode on this page or wherever you listen to podcasts. Purchase the professional development opportunity. Take the short quiz and earn your certificate. It's the professional development you want on your own schedule. Earn your certificate of completion for episode 109 now. Guest Bio Deborah Schwind, DHSc, OTR/L, BCP, SCSS Deborah Schwind is an occupational therapist with 30 years of experience in various pediatric settings, with the past 17 years in the public-school setting. She completed her doctoral dissertation from Drexel University. Her research focused on developing job skills, work behaviors, social skills, and self-determination skills through a school-based Community Based Instruction (CBI) program for students with autism in elementary school. She has presented nationally on transition skills, community-based instruction, IADL intervention, accessible curriculum, and adapted art tools. She has also been published on these topics, including a co-author of a chapter in Best Practices in School-Based Occupational Therapy. She graduated with an undergrad degree in OT from East Carolina University, where she completed internships at Duke University and Johns Hopkins University. She received her graduate degree from Old Dominion University in educational administration. She has worked in pediatric rehab, early intervention, home health, and inpatient (including NICU) as well as outpatient settings, most recently being in school-based practice. She is an active member of the AOTA Community of Practice Transition work group. She is Pediatric Board Certified through AOTA and has a School Specialty Certification. She recently received an Innovation in OT Award for the National Board for Certification of Occupational Therapy. Resources CBI in Elementary School - Research Article Logic Model FBA Project Search Program ESSA MTSS STEAM Problem Based Learning IDEA Closing the Gap on Transition Success AOTA Article Using Typical School Routines to Build Transition Sills AOTA Article Thanks for listening to the OT Schoolhouse Podcast! Be sure to subscribe to the OT Schoolhouse email list & get access to our free downloads of Gray-Space paper and the Occupational Profile for school-based OTs. Subscribe now! Thanks for visiting the podcast show notes! If you enjoyed this episode, be sure to subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcast, Spotify, or wherever you listen to podcasts Click here to view more episodes of the OT Schoolhouse Podcast

Episode 108: Frameworks used in School-based Occupational Therapy

Episode 108: Frameworks used in School-based Occupational Therapy

Click on your preferred podcast player link to listen wherever you enjoy podcasts Welcome to the show notes for Episode 108 of the OT Schoolhouse Podcast. Have you ever thought about the shifts that have happened throughout the history of Occupational Therapy in the schools? Occupational therapy has been a part of the school systems since the ‘70s when legislation was enacted at the national level. In this episode of the OT Schoolhouse Podcast, we will discuss several shifts in this field within the past 40 years. Our guest today is Julie Bissell, one of the occupational therapists who jumped into the schools early on to address the educational model in schools. Julie discusses transitioning from a medical model to an educational model and shares how we can facilitate participation and help the children perform in the least restrictive environment. We will also discuss an article she co-wrote titled Frameworks, Models and Trends in School-Based. This publication discusses a few frameworks within occupational therapy and relates them specifically to school-based practices in individual states and the United States. Also, stay tuned as she enlightens us about an Israeli handwriting assessment and how she assisted in translating this fun card game into English. Tune in to learn the following objectives: Learners will identify how the World Health Organization model helps to look at a human and their participation regardless of disability Learners will identify what the Pedi-Cat assessment addresses Learners will identify what the educational framework for child success includes and how it relates to the school curriculum. Earn Continuing Education for Listening to this Episode Wish you could earn professional development for listening to the OT Schoolhouse Podcast? Now you can! Click here to purchase the professional development opportunity that corresponds to this episode. Here's how it works in three simple steps: Listen to the episode on this page or wherever you listen to podcasts. Purchase the professional development opportunity. Take the short quiz and earn your certificate. It's the professional development you want on your own schedule. Earn your certificate of completion for episode 108 now. Guest Bio Julie Bissell, OTD, OTR/L, ATP, FAOTA Julie Bissell has over 30 years of experience as a School-based OT. She received her Master’s and Doctorate in Occupational Therapy from the University of Southern California and had the opportunity to learn from Dr. Jean Ayres. Before her work in schools, she worked with California Children's Services. She is also certified in (RESNA) Assistive Technology and Sensory Integration. Resources Article by Julie Bissell - Frameworks, Models and Trends in School-Based Occupational Therapy in the United States OTPF 4th Edition OT Fidelity to Treatment Example Universal Design for Learning Guidelines for OT and PT in the California Public Schools (2012) ICF Model Quality of life at school RtI Link 1 RtI Link 2 RtI Fidelity of Implementation Rubric Example MTSS Link 1 MTSS Link 2 Self-Assessment (HHIW) Self-Assessment handwriting article Here's How I Write (Hebrew) Pedi-Cat Assessment Thanks for listening to the OT Schoolhouse Podcast! Be sure to subscribe to the OT Schoolhouse email list & get access to our free downloads of Gray-Space paper and the Occupational Profile for school-based OTs. Subscribe now! Thanks for visiting the podcast show notes! If you enjoyed this episode, be sure to subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcast, Spotify, or wherever you listen to podcasts Click here to view more episodes of the OT Schoolhouse Podcast

Episode 107: Using PLAY as an Acronym to Support Students

Episode 107: Using PLAY as an Acronym to Support Students

Click on your preferred podcast player link to listen wherever you enjoy podcasts Welcome to the show notes for Episode 107 of the OT Schoolhouse Podcast. Our guest today proves how it is possible to make the best of a situation when unforeseen circumstances happen. The Covid Pandemic derailed Alvin from starting his private practice. Still, it allowed him to build up his social media and do something he enjoys, video editing. He has created videos to share with others about occupational therapy and his “P.L.A.Y on the Go Approach.” He shares content about treatment approaches, occupational balance, self-care, and even has “Toy Tuesday,” in which he shares different ways to use games that have easy accessibility in therapy rooms or clinics. Tune in to learn the following objectives: Learners will identify what P.L.A.Y stand for Learners will identify ways to help a child feel successful and confident Learners will identify the difference between adaptions and modifications Learners will identify the importance of incorporating students' interests during therapy sessions Earn Continuing Education for Listening to this Episode Wish you could earn professional development for listening to the OT Schoolhouse Podcast? Now you can! Click here to purchase the professional development opportunity that corresponds to this episode. Here's how it works in three simple steps: Listen to the episode on this page or wherever you listen to podcasts. Purchase the professional development opportunity. Take the short quiz and earn your certificate. It's the professional development you want on your own schedule. Earn your certificate of completion for episode 107 now. Guest Bio Alvin Pineda MS, OTR/L Alvin Pineda is a Pediatric Occupational Therapist based in the San Fransico Bay Area. He is the owner of Alvin P. Occupational Therapy Services and Outside The Box Treatment Solutions LLC. As a pediatric OT, he has experience in multiple settings from home health, school-based, and currently outpatient private practice. He specializes in child-led therapy in sensory processing, developmental delays, and self-regulation with experiences with a wide range of abilities and age ranges from 3- 21+. Aside from his clinical work, Alvin is the online content creator behind OT.Outside.The.Box on Instagram and Facebook. He has created his platform to inspire other pediatric practitioners to be confident and creative therapists. To facilitate creative clinical reasoning, Alvin created The P.L.A.Y on the Go Approach to guide practitioners to adapt and modify any activity to meet their client’s just right challenge. Notable Quotes “We need to think on the go, on learning how to adapt, learning how to modify and meet each child's needs within that just right challenge. So it's really working on facilitating that ability to really kind of look at an activity and look at the task analysis” -Alvin “I think that's so important to advocate that and really showcase that decreased core can also impact handwriting ability, not many kinds of educators know that, so that's where our OTs lense in development comes into play.” -Alvin “In all of our evaluations, we have to tie the overarching occupation to those component skills, and vice versa. You’ve got to tie it back and forth” - Jayson “Sometimes we have to do what we have to do. We have to make sure we're 100% for ourselves because then our sessions and our evaluations, and our reports will be 100 times better.” -Alvin Resources P.L.A.Y. on the Go Approach Handout Occupational Therapy Practice Framework Alvin's Instagram Alvin's Facebook Thanks for listening to the OT Schoolhouse Podcast! Be sure to subscribe to the OT Schoolhouse email list & get access to our free downloads of Gray-Space paper and the Occupational Profile for school-based OTs. Subscribe now! Thanks for visiting the podcast show notes! If you enjoyed this episode be sure to subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcast, Spotify, or wherever you listen to podcasts Click here to view more episodes of the OT Schoolhouse Podcast

Episode 106: Goal Writing in School-based OT

Episode 106: Goal Writing in School-based OT

Click on your preferred podcast player link to listen wherever you enjoy podcasts Welcome to the show notes for Episode 106 of the OT Schoolhouse Podcast. As OTP’s we know that goal writing can get a bit difficult at times. Understanding each component of a goal will ultimately lead to better goal writing. Taking the time to write goals is a huge part of helping the students and other people involved see what progress has been made. Today we are speaking with Sarah Beaulieu, MOT, OTR/L. and Emily Deller, MOT, OTR/L. They are speaking in-depth about their experience with goal writing in their districts and how it can differ in different districts and states. If you struggle with writing goals in a school-based setting, their goal writing workshop can help with mastering SMART, client-centered goals that are easy to measure. Tune in to learn the following objectives: Listeners will learn about SMART goals Listeners will learn the key components to writing a great goal Listeners will learn how goals differ in a school-based setting and a pediatric clinic setting Listeners will learn more about the long-term and short-term goals in the school-based setting Listeners will learn more about changing and updating goals in a school-based setting Listeners will learn how to write more collaborative goals Guest Bio Emily Deller, MOT, OTR/L Emily Deller, MOT, OTR/L is passionate about sharing her knowledge with OTs and healthcare professionals, her ‘OT brain’ is rarely off. She graduated from the University of the Sciences in Philadelphia with her Master's in Occupational therapy in 2016 with honors and the Occupational Therapy Faculty Award. She is currently a pediatric Occupational Therapist for the Delaware Autism Program and Delaware School for the Deaf. She has provided occupational therapy services in homes, schools, and to the pediatric population in her community. She also is an adjunct professor at Wesley College in Delaware. Sarah Beaulieu, MOT, OTR/L is a school-based occupational therapist going into her 5th school year working with early elementary students. She began her OT journey in the outpatient clinic setting, where she found her passion for pediatrics. Sarah is the owner of Sarah Bee OT LLC, where she creates high-quality therapy resources and educational content for OT practitioners across all pediatric settings. Notable Quotes "The main idea of writing school-based OT goals are for accessing your education" -Emily D. "Goal writing, especially for school-based is not something that’s always well taught in OT programs, so it is difficult to know whether or not you're writing good goals, high-quality goals." -Sarah B “So, legally goals are required to show what skills we are addressing in order to provide those direct services in a public school environment” - Emily D “I like to think of RTI as writing more goals for a classroom, as opposed to an IEP as goals for an individual student” -Jayson D “A stranger should be able to read your goal and know exactly how to implement that goal, they should really have a clear understanding of what you're trying to target and how you're going to measure that goal” - Sarah B “We know a lot of times the skills that are presented at home are different than in school” - Emily D “More goals don't always mean more progress” - Emily D “Making sure that you have a plan on how you're both going to, contribute to working towards that goal, what unique skills you're going to be bringing to the table in order to help them achieve that goal” -Sarah B Resources Emily's Website Sarah's Website Sarah's Instagram Emily's Instagram Goal Writing Workshop Best Practices for Occupational Therapy in Schools, 2nd Edition ASHA statement for Collaborative Goals in School-based Practice Documenting OT Practice” by Karen Sames Documenting OT services in Schools- AOTA Thanks for listening to the OT Schoolhouse Podcast! Be sure to subscribe to the OT Schoolhouse email list & get access to our free downloads of Gray-Space paper and the Occupational Profile for school-based OTs. Subscribe now! Thanks for visiting the podcast show notes! If you enjoyed this episode be sure to subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcast, Spotify, or wherever you listen to podcasts Click here to view more episodes of the OT Schoolhouse Podcast

Episode 105: Why I Created My Own Adapted Handwriting Paper

Episode 105: Why I Created My Own Adapted Handwriting Paper

Click on your preferred podcast player link to listen wherever you enjoy podcasts Welcome to the show notes for Episode 105 of the OT Schoolhouse Podcast. As an OT practitioner in the schools, it doesn’t take long to realize that most of the evaluation referrals coming your way are due to handwriting concerns. As such, you have probably begun to fine-tune your ability to promote increased fine motor, visual motor, and manual dexterity skills. But another way to address handwriting is through adapting the environment and using tools to support students’ ability to learn handwriting in a new way. In this episode of the OT Schoolhouse Podcast, I want to introduce you to an adapted paper I developed over 5 years and still recommend to parents and teachers today. I also want to give it to you for free so that you can use and share it as well. Have a listen to learn the following objectives: Learn about common types of adapted paper used by School-Based OTPs Learn why and how I decided to create Gray-Space Paper Learn how to use Gray-Space Paper to support students with handwriting difficulties Resources Gray-Space Paper Abilitations Hi-Write Paper Do2Learn Stop-Go paper Learning (Handwriting) Without Tears Thanks for listening to the OT Schoolhouse Podcast! Be sure to subscribe to the OT Schoolhouse email list & get access to our free downloads of Gray-Space paper and the Occupational Profile for school-based OTs. Subscribe now! Thanks for visiting the podcast show notes! If you enjoyed this episode be sure to subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcast, Spotify, or wherever you listen to podcasts Click here to view more episodes of the OT Schoolhouse Podcast

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